Feed aggregator

Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world's biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

CNBC - Sat, 01/26/2019 - 06:00
The retailer failed to keep pace with changes, losing touch with shoppers and toymakers.

REUTERS: Chinese ambassador calls on Australia to drop 'Cold War mentality'

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 11 min 41 sec ago
CANBERRA/SYDNEY (Reuters) - China's ambassador to Australia said on Tuesday "less bias and bigotry" was needed to repair bilateral relations amid concerns over Chinese influence in Australia and its use of loans to build leverage over poorer South Pacific island nations.

Chinese ambassador calls on Australia to drop 'Cold War mentality'

REUTERS - 11 min 41 sec ago
CANBERRA/SYDNEY (Reuters) - China's ambassador to Australia said on Tuesday "less bias and bigotry" was needed to repair bilateral relations amid concerns over Chinese influence in Australia and its use of loans to build leverage over poorer South Pacific island nations.

US Senate Passes Defense Bill, Battle Looms with Trump over China's ZTE

VOICE OF AMERICA - 14 min 15 sec ago
The U.S. Senate passed a $716 billion defense policy bill on Monday, backing President Donald Trump’s call for a bigger, stronger military but setting up a potential battle with the White House over Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE Corp. The Republican-controlled Senate voted 85-10 for the annual National Defense Authorization Act, or NDAA, which authorizes U.S. military spending but is generally used as a vehicle for a broad range of policy matters. Before it can become law, the bill must be reconciled with one already passed by the House of Representatives. That compromise measure must then be passed by both chambers and signed into law by Trump. The fiscal 2019 Senate version of the NDAA authorizes $639 billion in base defense spending, for such things as buying weapons, ships and aircraft and paying the troops, with an additional $69 billion to fund ongoing conflicts. This year, the Senate included an amendment that would kill the Trump administration’s agreement to allow ZTE to resume business with U.S. suppliers. That ZTE provision is not included in the House version of the NDAA. While strongly supported by some of Trump’s fellow Republicans as well as some Democrats, the measure is opposed by the White House and some of its close Republican allies, who control the House as well as the Senate. It could face a difficult path to being included in the final NDAA. That bill is more likely to include a much less stringent provision, included in the House bill, that would bar the Defense Department from dealing with any entity using telecommunications equipment or services from ZTE or another Chinese company, Huawei Technologies. Republicans and Democrats have expressed national security concerns about ZTE after it broke an agreement to discipline executives who had conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea. The U.S. government placed a ban on ZTE earlier this year, but the Trump administration reached an agreement to lift the ban while it is negotiating broader trade agreements with China and looking to Beijing for support during negotiations to halt North Korea's nuclear weapons program. Foreign investment rules The Senate version of the NDAA also seeks to strengthen the inter-agency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which assesses deals to ensure they do not compromise national security. The bill would allow CFIUS to expand the deals that can be reviewed, for example making reviews of many proposed transactions mandatory instead of voluntary and allowing CFIUSto review land purchases near sensitive military sites. The Senate NDAA also includes an amendment prohibiting sales to Turkey of F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jets made by Lockheed Martin Corp unless Trump certifies Turkey is not threatening NATO, purchasing defense equipment from Russia or detaining U.S. citizens. Senators included the legislation because of the imprisonment of U.S. pastor Andrew Brunson and the purchase of the S-400 air defense system from Russia. Shipbuilders General Dynamics Corp and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc could benefit from the bill’s authorization of advance procurement of materials needed for the Virginia class nuclear submarines. This year’s Senate bill was named after six-term Senator John McCain, the Armed Services Committee’s Republican chairman and Vietnam War prisoner of war, who has been absent from Washington all year as he undergoes treatment for brain cancer.

US Senate Passes Defense Bill, Battle Looms with Trump over China's ZTE

VOICE OF AMERICA POLITICS - 14 min 15 sec ago
The U.S. Senate passed a $716 billion defense policy bill on Monday, backing President Donald Trump’s call for a bigger, stronger military but setting up a potential battle with the White House over Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE Corp. The Republican-controlled Senate voted 85-10 for the annual National Defense Authorization Act, or NDAA, which authorizes U.S. military spending but is generally used as a vehicle for a broad range of policy matters. Before it can become law, the bill must be reconciled with one already passed by the House of Representatives. That compromise measure must then be passed by both chambers and signed into law by Trump. The fiscal 2019 Senate version of the NDAA authorizes $639 billion in base defense spending, for such things as buying weapons, ships and aircraft and paying the troops, with an additional $69 billion to fund ongoing conflicts. This year, the Senate included an amendment that would kill the Trump administration’s agreement to allow ZTE to resume business with U.S. suppliers. That ZTE provision is not included in the House version of the NDAA. While strongly supported by some of Trump’s fellow Republicans as well as some Democrats, the measure is opposed by the White House and some of its close Republican allies, who control the House as well as the Senate. It could face a difficult path to being included in the final NDAA. That bill is more likely to include a much less stringent provision, included in the House bill, that would bar the Defense Department from dealing with any entity using telecommunications equipment or services from ZTE or another Chinese company, Huawei Technologies. Republicans and Democrats have expressed national security concerns about ZTE after it broke an agreement to discipline executives who had conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran and North Korea. The U.S. government placed a ban on ZTE earlier this year, but the Trump administration reached an agreement to lift the ban while it is negotiating broader trade agreements with China and looking to Beijing for support during negotiations to halt North Korea's nuclear weapons program. Foreign investment rules The Senate version of the NDAA also seeks to strengthen the inter-agency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which assesses deals to ensure they do not compromise national security. The bill would allow CFIUS to expand the deals that can be reviewed, for example making reviews of many proposed transactions mandatory instead of voluntary and allowing CFIUSto review land purchases near sensitive military sites. The Senate NDAA also includes an amendment prohibiting sales to Turkey of F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jets made by Lockheed Martin Corp unless Trump certifies Turkey is not threatening NATO, purchasing defense equipment from Russia or detaining U.S. citizens. Senators included the legislation because of the imprisonment of U.S. pastor Andrew Brunson and the purchase of the S-400 air defense system from Russia. Shipbuilders General Dynamics Corp and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc could benefit from the bill’s authorization of advance procurement of materials needed for the Virginia class nuclear submarines. This year’s Senate bill was named after six-term Senator John McCain, the Armed Services Committee’s Republican chairman and Vietnam War prisoner of war, who has been absent from Washington all year as he undergoes treatment for brain cancer.

Key Trump allies seek way out of immigration crisis

CNN POLITICS - 17 min 15 sec ago
Republicans are growing anxious over President Donald Trump's policy to break up families at the border -- and now even his closest allies are trying to help find a way out of a growing political crisis.

CNN's Gary Tuchman speaks to several

CNN - 17 min 20 sec ago
CNN's Gary Tuchman speaks to several families that have been waiting for days at a legal checkpoint outside of Arizona in hopes of seeking asylum in the US.

China's Xiaomi to postpone its mainland CDR offering

TECHNEWS - 17 min 32 sec ago
BEIJING (Reuters) - China's Xiaomi Corp [XTC.UL] said on Tuesday it will postpone its mainland share offering until after it completes its listing in Hong Kong.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

TASS [Russian State News]: RF air transport agency says Saudi plane incident in Rostov-on-Don under investigation

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 17 min 40 sec ago
Rosaviatsiya will investigate the circumstances and causes of the incident involving all interested sides, the statement said

RF air transport agency says Saudi plane incident in Rostov-on-Don under investigation

TASS [Russian State News] - 17 min 40 sec ago
Rosaviatsiya will investigate the circumstances and causes of the incident involving all interested sides, the statement said

BBC: Macron tells teen to call him 'Mr President'

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 19 min 33 sec ago
The French president was meeting young people when one student called him something he didn't like.

Macron tells teen to call him 'Mr President'

BBC - 19 min 33 sec ago
The French president was meeting young people when one student called him something he didn't like.

Trump told Apple CEO iPhones will be spared from China tariffs: NYT

TECHNEWS - 30 min 32 sec ago
(Reuters) - President Donald Trump told Apple Inc Chief Executive Tim Cook that the U.S. government would not levy tariffs on iPhones assembled in China, the New York Times reported on Monday, citing a source familiar with the negotiations.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

Donald Trump threatens China with additional tariffs

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 33 min 35 sec ago

President Trump escalated his trade feud with China on Monday night, threatening to impose tariffs of 10 percent on another $200 billion worth of Chinese goods in retaliation for previous tariffs and Beijing's intellectual-property practices.

"After the legal process is complete, these tariffs will go into effect if China refuses ...

Administration officials say there was no call between US and North Korea this weekend

CNN POLITICS - 33 min 51 sec ago
There was no call between US and North Korean officials over the weekend, two administration officials tell CNN, despite President Donald Trump telling Fox News on Friday that he planned on "calling North Korea" over the Father's Day holiday.

Beijing subway to get 'bio-ID' tracking systems: China Daily

TECHNEWS - 37 min 36 sec ago
SHANGHAI (Reuters) - The Chinese capital, Beijing, is looking at introducing "bio-recognition technology", including palm scanners and facial recognition cameras, to speed up passenger flow through subway stations at peak times, state media reported on Tuesday.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

As outrage grows over children, White House defends immigration policy

REUTERS POLITICS - 41 min 10 sec ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as furor grew over the separation of immigrant parents and children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages.

REUTERS: As outrage grows over children, White House defends immigration policy

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 41 min 10 sec ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as furor grew over the separation of immigrant parents and children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages.

As outrage grows over children, White House defends immigration policy

REUTERS - 41 min 10 sec ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as furor grew over the separation of immigrant parents and children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages.

White House scrambles to contain immigration fallout

CNN POLITICS - 49 min 54 sec ago
The White House, facing mounting outcry and contradictory statements about President Donald Trump's practice of separating children from their parents at the US border, entered damage control mode on Monday.

Ex-CIA employee charged with leaking classified data, child porn offenses

CNBC - 52 min 42 sec ago
Joshua Schulte, a New York City resident, was charged for alleged theft of classified information from the CIA.

Pentagon Suspends August Military Drills with South Korea

VOICE OF AMERICA - 57 min ago
The Pentagon on Monday formally suspended a major military exercise planned for August with South Korea, a much-anticipated move stemming from President Donald Trump's nuclear summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.   Dana White, spokeswoman for the Defense Department, said planning for the summer drills has stopped, but there have been no decisions made on any other military exercises with South Korea. Military exercises with other countries in the Pacific will continue.   Speaking at a news conference last Tuesday after his summit with Kim, Trump abruptly announced that he was suspending military exercises with the South, "unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should." He added that dumping the drills will save the U.S. "a tremendous amount of money. Plus, I think it's very provocative."   His announcement appeared to catch U.S. defense officials by surprise, and his comments ran counter to long-held American arguments that the exercises are critical for effective operations with allies and are defensive in nature. The Pentagon has for years flatly denied North Korean assertions that the exercises are "provocative."   But as the days went by, the U.S. and Seoul began discussions about temporarily suspending the large Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercises that usually take place in August and possibly other joint drills while nuclear diplomacy with North Korea continues. Seoul's Defense Ministry said Friday that Defense Minister Song Young-moo held "deep" discussions about the drills with U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis in a telephone conversation Thursday evening.   Trump's decision to suspend the exercises, coupled with the vague joint statement issued after his summit with Kim, have reinforced fears in South Korea that the North is attempting to take advantage of a U.S. president who appears to care less about the traditional alliance than his predecessors.   Last year's Ulchi Freedom Guardian went on for 11 days in August and involved about 17,500 U.S. troops. Also participating were troops from nations that contributed forces during the 1950-53 Korean War, including Australia, Britain, Canada and Colombia.   The other major U.S. exercises with South Korea — Key Resolve and Foal Eagle — took place earlier this spring. They historically include live-fire drills with tanks, aircraft and warships and feature about 10,000 American and 200,000 Korean troops. The drills typically begin in March but were delayed a bit because of the Winter Olympics in South Korea in February.   North Korea has always reacted to the Ulchi exercises with belligerence and often its own demonstrations of military capability. During last year's Ulchi exercises, North Korea fired a powerful new intermediate-range missile over Japan in what its state media described as a "muscle-flexing" countermeasure to the drills.   Military readiness and lethality have been key priorities for Mattis, so it is still not clear what, if any, smaller exercises may be conducted in the region with South Korea or if more desktop drills may be planned to compensate for the lack of larger, more coordinated events with various ships, aircraft and thousands of troops.   Defense officials are also scrambling to pull together cost estimates for the various exercises with the South to inform Trump's assertion that the suspension will save an enormous amount of money. Mattis's office sent out a request to military commands last Wednesday seeking information on costs, but the Pentagon has yet to provide a public answer.

Republicans demand names of anti-Trump FBI employees from bombshell IG report

FOXNEWS POLITICS - 57 min 42 sec ago
A group of eight House Republicans has asked Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz to give them the names of FBI employees mentioned in last week's report on the Hillary Clinton email investigation, some of whom were portrayed as anti-Trump.

Ex-Maryland senator awaiting fraud sentence to repay $5K

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 1 min ago

BALTIMORE (AP) - A former Maryland senator who pleaded guilty in a federal bribery case has agreed to forfeit $5,000 as part of a plea deal.

The Daily Record of Baltimore reports the payment was filed in court Monday. Seventy-one-year-old Nathaniel T. Oaks pleaded guilty in March to fraud charges ...

TASS [Russian State News]: Washington committed to Syrian southwest ceasefire arrangement, Pompeo says to Lavrov

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 1 hour 2 min ago
According to US State Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert, Lavrov and Pompeo had discussed "issues and concerns related to Syria and the bilateral relationship"

Washington committed to Syrian southwest ceasefire arrangement, Pompeo says to Lavrov

TASS [Russian State News] - 1 hour 2 min ago
According to US State Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert, Lavrov and Pompeo had discussed "issues and concerns related to Syria and the bilateral relationship"

Family separation policy faces headwinds in New Mexico

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 5 min ago

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) - The Trump administration policy of separating immigrant children from their parents is being met by doubts from a Republican candidate for governor of New Mexico and forceful condemnation from the Democratic competitor. Both candidates in the border state also serve in Congress.

Republican Congressman and ...

Inside the Beltway: The media creates its own border war

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 5 min ago

There is a surge of journalists at the Southwest border, all seeking insight on immigration and the "family separation crisis," this according to CNN analyst Brian Stelter, who blamed it all on "President Trump's lies about the policy" for the interest.

Trouble is, the news coverage is flawed, and even ...

Chinese resorts are quietly setting up baccarat tables in Hainan, and Macau may have reason to be nervous

SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST - 1 hour 9 min ago
They’re not quite casinos, but they’re pretty close – and they could be coming to China sooner than some expected. On the tropical island of Hainan, at least five Chinese-owned resorts are laying the groundwork for so-called entertainment bars, where players put down real money on games but receive their winnings in the form of points that can be redeemed in local shops, restaurants and hotels, according to people with direct knowledge of the plans. The resorts’ owners...

Republicans abandon Donald Trump over 'zero tolerance' border policy

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 9 min ago

Congressional Republicans beat a full-scale retreat Monday from the administration's zero-tolerance border policy, joining Democrats to demand that President Trump stop jailing parents and find ways to keep families together while trying to stop a new surge of illegal immigration.

High-profile Republicans said they are writing bills that would end ...

Authorities fear ISIS may have assigned

CNN - 1 hour 23 min ago
Authorities fear ISIS may have assigned a top bomb-maker to arm unmanned drones with bombs. CNN's Brian Todd reports.

Trump threatens more tariffs on Chinese goods

SKY NEWS - 1 hour 26 min ago
President Trump has asked officials to identify $200bn dollars-worth of Chinese goods to be subject to a 10% tariff in what is becoming an increasingly bitter trade war.

Norway Tests Tiny Electric Plane, Sees Passenger Flights by 2025

VOA TECH - 1 hour 26 min ago
Norway tested a two-seater electric plane on Monday and predicted a start to passenger flights by 2025 if new aviation technologies match a green shift that has made Norwegians the world's top buyers of electric cars. Transport Minister Ketil Solvik-Olsen and Dag Falk-Petersen, head of state-run Avinor which runs most of Norway's airports, took a few minutes' flight around Oslo airport in an Alpha Electro G2 plane, built by Pipistrel in Slovenia. "This is ... a first example that we are moving fast forward" towards greener aviation, Solvik-Olsen told Reuters. "We do have to make sure it is safe - people won't fly if they don't trust it." He said plane makers such as Boeing and Airbus were developing electric aircraft and that battery prices were tumbling, making it feasible to reach a government goal of making all domestic flights in Norway electric by 2040. Asked when passenger flights in electric planes could start, Falk-Petersen, the pilot, said: "My best guess is before 2025 ... It should all be electrified by 2040." The two said the plane, with a takeoff weight of 570 kg (1255 lb), was cramped and buffeted by winds but far quieter than a conventional plane run on fossil fuels. Norway tops the world league for per capita sales of electric cars such as Teslas, Nissan Leafs or Volkswagen Golfs, backed by incentives such as big tax breaks, free parking and exemptions from road tolls. In May 2018, 56 percent of all cars sold in Norway were either pure electric or hybrids against 46 percent in the same month of 2017, according to official statistics. Norway, a mountainous country of five million people where fjords and remote islands mean many short-hop routes of less than 200 kms, would be ideal for electric planes, Solvik-Olsen said. Also, 98 percent of electricity in Norway is generated from clean hydro power. Some opposition politicians said the government needed to do far more to meet green commitments in the 200-nation Paris climate agreement. "This is a start ... but we have to make jet fuel a lot more expensive," said Arild Hermstad, a leader of the Green Party. The first electric planes flew across the English Channel in July 2015, including an Airbus E-Fan. French aviator Louis Bleriot who was first to fly across the Channel, in 1909, in a fossil-fuel powered plane. Electric planes so far have big problems of weight, with bulky batteries and limited ranges. Both Falk-Petersen and Solvik-Olsen said they had been on strict diets before the flight. "My wife is happy about it," Solvik-Olsen said.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

AI for animals

BBC TECH - 1 hour 35 min ago
University researchers are using deep neural networks to study wildlife and enhance conservation.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

New migrant rules could shutter some Maryland crab houses

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 37 min ago

BALTIMORE (AP) - Many Maryland crab houses expect to stay idle this summer after U.S. immigration officials approved additional migrant worker visas this month for only one picking house.

The Baltimore Sun reports the H-2B visas for seasonal workers were awarded by lottery for the first time this year due ...

Donald Trump readies $200 billion in China tariffs, citing 'unacceptable' policies

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 42 min ago

President Trump escalated his trade feud with China Monday night, threatening to impose tariffs of 10 percent on another $200 billion worth of Chinese goods.

"After the legal process is complete, these tariffs will go into effect if China refuses to change its practices," the president said in a statement.

...

Pelosi calls for Trump to end 'inhumane, barbaric' policy at the border

FOXNEWS POLITICS - 1 hour 42 min ago
Congressional lawmakers met with men, women and children detained at the international boundary in several immigration detention facilities, where Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi called President Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy “an utter atrocity that debases America’s values and our legacy as a beacon of hope, opportunity and freedom.”

John Kasich, Jeb Bush join uproar against Trump administration's 'zero tolerance' border policy

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 44 min ago

Republicans eyeing a run against President Trump in 2020 have eagerly joined the uproar over the treatment of illegal immigrant children at the border.

They seized upon the spectacle of children taken away from parents charged with border jumping and used it as a platform to call the president and ...

Democrats press U.S. Justice Dept. officials on possible leaks to Giuliani

REUTERS POLITICS - 1 hour 50 min ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Democrats on Monday pressed Justice Department officials about whether some FBI agents may have leaked damaging information about Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to Rudy Giuliani, now an adviser to U.S. President Donald Trump, shortly before the 2016 election.

VOICE OF EUROPE: Right-Wing Italian Interior Minister Wants to Look into 'Roma Question'

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 1 hour 51 min ago
Italy's new right-wing interior minister Matteo Salvini said his department has to look into "the Roma question" in Italy — a comment the opposition said reminds them of Italian fascism. Salvini said Monday he wants to take a census of Italy's Roma population. "Unfortunately, we will have to keep the Italian Roma because we can't expel them," Salvini told Telelombardia television. Center-left politicians immediately jumped on Salvini's comments, likening it to ethnic cleansing. "You can work for security and respect for rules without becoming fascistic," lawmaker Ettore Rosato tweeted. "The announced census of Roma is vulgar and demagogical." But Salvini said he wants to help the Roma, an itinerant ethnic group. He said he wants to know who they are and where they live, and protect Roma children, whose parents he said did not want them to integrate into society. "We are aiming primarily to care for the children who aren't allowed to go to school regularly because they prefer to introduce them to a life of crime," he said. The interior minister said he has no desire to take fingerprints of the Roma or keep index cards of individuals. He also said he wants to see how European Union funds earmarked to help the Roma are spent. Many Roma live in camps on the outskirts of Italian cities. They complain of lifelong discrimination, being denied job and educational opportunities. But officials say many Roma are responsible for petty crimes, such as pickpocketing and theft. Salvini's comments about the Roma came a week after Italy refused to let a shipload of migrants dock at an Italian port. Spain gave permission for the ship to dock in its country Sunday.

Right-Wing Italian Interior Minister Wants to Look into 'Roma Question'

VOICE OF EUROPE - 1 hour 51 min ago
Italy's new right-wing interior minister Matteo Salvini said his department has to look into "the Roma question" in Italy — a comment the opposition said reminds them of Italian fascism. Salvini said Monday he wants to take a census of Italy's Roma population. "Unfortunately, we will have to keep the Italian Roma because we can't expel them," Salvini told Telelombardia television. Center-left politicians immediately jumped on Salvini's comments, likening it to ethnic cleansing. "You can work for security and respect for rules without becoming fascistic," lawmaker Ettore Rosato tweeted. "The announced census of Roma is vulgar and demagogical." But Salvini said he wants to help the Roma, an itinerant ethnic group. He said he wants to know who they are and where they live, and protect Roma children, whose parents he said did not want them to integrate into society. "We are aiming primarily to care for the children who aren't allowed to go to school regularly because they prefer to introduce them to a life of crime," he said. The interior minister said he has no desire to take fingerprints of the Roma or keep index cards of individuals. He also said he wants to see how European Union funds earmarked to help the Roma are spent. Many Roma live in camps on the outskirts of Italian cities. They complain of lifelong discrimination, being denied job and educational opportunities. But officials say many Roma are responsible for petty crimes, such as pickpocketing and theft. Salvini's comments about the Roma came a week after Italy refused to let a shipload of migrants dock at an Italian port. Spain gave permission for the ship to dock in its country Sunday.

Can 'Land Banks' Help Rebuild Post-industrial US Cities?

VOICE OF AMERICA - 1 hour 57 min ago
When Jamil Bey wanted to move back to the Pittsburgh neighborhood where he had grown up, he found the perfect house to buy. There was just one problem — a fall in property values on that street had left the owners trapped in negative equity. Unable to agree on a price that would allow the sellers to pay off their mortgage, Bey realized he would not be able to buy a house in his old neighborhood — and that the owners would be stuck with a property they did not want. Across the United States, former manufacturing centers like Pittsburgh have experienced overwhelming population declines in recent decades, pushing down property prices and leaving homes empty and neglected. "For folks who have a connection to those neighborhoods because they grew up there, there's not a whole lot of quality properties to chose from," Bey told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. "Even if you're looking for property to invest in, you can't fund new construction because the property values in those neighborhoods are too low." It took a trip to New York state for Bey to find a potential solution to the problem blighting his city — land banks, which have the power to search out vacant properties and work to return them to the market. "I was in Syracuse and realizing that the vacant lots looked well taken care of — planted, with cut grass and nicely maintained," he said. "And I was told, 'We have a land bank'." Many former industrial cities, particularly in the northeastern United States, have lost a quarter of their population or more since the 1950s, according to census data. Pittsburgh, once one of the largest and most prosperous cities in the country, has been among the hardest hit. Some neighborhoods there have suffered population declines of 80 percent and more, said Bey, setting up a cycle of decline that has blighted entire communities. Recycling Land Bey is now vice chairman of the Pittsburgh Land Bank, which is set to start operating this summer, aiming to take on the growing numbers of abandoned properties in the city. He describes its remit as "recycling land" — working through entanglements of ownership, addressing tax issues and fixing up or tearing down structures with a view to getting vacant property back on the market or giving it over as a public space. Houses that have sat for long enough to become blighted are often saddled with significant tax arrears, reducing their appeal to investors. Many land banks are able to short-circuit this process, clearing arrears before addressing regulatory violations to make the property appealing to new buyers. Land banks have existed in the United States since the 1980s, but interest has spiked since the economic downturn of 2008-09, according to law professor Frank S. Alexander. That created a wave of foreclosures in which "abandonment was occurring, particularly at the low end of the property spectrum," said Alexander, a leading authority on land banking who said the sector had seen "tremendous growth" as a result. Around 170 land banks were operating across the country as of January, according to the Center for Community Progress, which Alexander co-founded. Land banking initially concentrated on post-industrial inner cities, but since the recession demand has expanded to other areas, said Alexander. "I don't go in and evangelize, but rather work with state and local officials on why vacant and abandoned properties are killing their neighborhoods and cities," he said. And the first thing they need to do is acknowledge the cost of doing nothing." 'Missing Tooth' In some places, authorities at the highest levels have taken this lesson to heart. In 2013, New York's attorney general announced the creation of a seed fund for land banks across the state, drawing on legal settlements from big financial institutions involved in the housing crisis that preceded the recession. Today, there are 25 land banks operating across the state, which turned around more than $28 million worth of property through 2016 according to a report last year from the Center for Community Progress. Jocelyn Gordon oversees a land bank in Buffalo, a city in western New York that has some of the oldest housing stock in the country but has lost half of its population. The city has seen over 6,000 demolitions in the past decade and has thousands of vacant lots. Many of the houses that remain are enormous and so energy-inefficient that residents' fuel bills can exceed their rents, Gordon said. The situation, she says, is "desperate ... it's a huge problem." Her Buffalo Erie Niagara Land Improvement Corporation (BENLIC) is taking over vacant parcels of land and building or retrofitting to make smaller and more energy-efficient homes. BENLIC takes on about 70 properties annually, a figure it hopes to increase to 120. It aims to take on the parcels of land it feels will have the biggest impact in a neighbourhood — what Gordon calls filling in a block's "missing tooth." "If there's a demolition on a lot in a marketable neighborhood, and we can strengthen that block," she said, "that's the most fulfilling part."

Trump is as popular as he's ever been (in 1 poll)

CNN POLITICS - 1 hour 57 min ago
For the first time since his first week in office, 45% of Americans approve of the job President Donald Trump is doing in a new Gallup poll released Monday.

Ex-CIA worker charged with disclosing classified information

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 1 hour 58 min ago

NEW YORK (AP) - A former CIA employee from New York was charged Monday with the theft of classified national defense information from the agency.

Joshua Adam Schulte, of Manhattan, was charged in a 13-count superseding indictment returned by a grand jury.

According to the indictment, Schulte stole the classified ...

US cancels military exercise with South Korea

FINANCIAL TIMES - 2 hours 1 min ago
Concrete step comes after Washington and Pyongyang pursue talks towards denuclearisation
Categories: FINANCIAL NEWS

Asian shares poised to edge higher despite trade jitters; oil prices rise

CNBC - 2 hours 1 min ago
Oil prices settled higher following reports exporters were discussing a smaller-than-expected increase in production.

REUTERS: Libya's coast guard recovers five bodies from migrant boat

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 2 min ago
TRIPOLI (Reuters) - Libyan coastguards said on Monday they had recovered the bodies of five migrants and picked 191 survivors off the coast west of the capital Tripoli.

Libya's coast guard recovers five bodies from migrant boat

REUTERS - 2 hours 2 min ago
TRIPOLI (Reuters) - Libyan coastguards said on Monday they had recovered the bodies of five migrants and picked 191 survivors off the coast west of the capital Tripoli.

Immigration detention policy becomes major issue in media

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 2 hours 3 min ago

NEW YORK (AP) - In a phone conversation with her executive producer over the weekend, "CBS This Morning" anchor Gayle King wondered if there wasn't more the network could do on the story of children being separated from parents through the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy. Almost before she ...

Pentagon says it's 'suspended all planning' for military exercise with South Korea

CNN POLITICS - 2 hours 4 min ago
The Pentagon has "suspended all planning" as expected for August joint military exercises with South Korea and several allies in the region, to comply with President Donald Trump's desire to pull back on so-called "war games," according to a statement from Dana White, chief Pentagon spokesperson.

Intel Tops List of Tech Companies Fighting Forced Labor

VOA TECH - 2 hours 5 min ago
      Intel topped a list issued on Monday ranking how well technology companies combat the risk of forced labor in their supply chains, overtaking HP and Apple. Most of the top 40 global technology companies assessed in the study by KnowTheChain, an online resource for business, had made progress since the last report was published in 2016. But the study found there was still room for improvement. “The sector needs to advance their efforts further down the supply chain in order to truly protect vulnerable workers,” said Kilian Moote, project director of KnowTheChain, in a statement. Intel, HP and Apple scored the highest on the list, which looked at factors including purchasing practices, monitoring and auditing processes. China-based BOE Technology Group and Taiwan's Largan Precision came bottom. Workers who make the components used by technology companies are often migrants vulnerable to exploitative working conditions, the report said.  About 25 million people globally were estimated to be trapped in forced labor in 2016, according to the International Labor Organization and rights group Walk Free Foundation. Laborers in technology companies’ supply chains are sometimes charged high recruitment fees to get jobs, trapped in debt servitude, or deprived of their passports or other documents, the report said. It highlighted a failure to give workers a voice through grievance mechanisms and tackle exploitative recruiting practices as the main areas of concern across the sector. In recent years modern slavery has increasingly come under the global spotlight, putting ever greater regulatory and consumer pressure on firms to ensure their supply chains are free of forced labor, child labor and other forms of slavery. From cosmetics and clothes to shrimp and smartphones, supply chains are often complex with multiple layers across various countries — whether in sourcing the raw materials or creating the final product — making it hard to identify exploitation. Overall, large technology companies fared better than smaller ones, suggesting a strong link between size and capacity to take action, the report said. Amazon, which ranked 20th, was a notable exception, it said. “Top-ranking brands ... are listening to workers in their supply chains and weeding out unscrupulous recruitment processes,” Phil Bloomer, head of the Business & Human Rights Resource Center, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. A spokesman for Amazon said the report drew from old and incomplete information and failed to take into account recently launched anti-slavery commitments and initiatives. HP said it regularly assessed its supply chain to identify and address any concerns and risks of exploitation. “We strive to ensure that workers in our supply chain have fair treatment, safe working conditions, and freely chosen employment,” said Annukka Dickens, HP's director for human rights and supply chain responsibility. Intel, Apple, BOE Technology and Largan Precision did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

Intel Tops List of Tech Companies Fighting Forced Labor

VOICE OF AMERICA - 2 hours 5 min ago
      Intel topped a list issued on Monday ranking how well technology companies combat the risk of forced labor in their supply chains, overtaking HP and Apple. Most of the top 40 global technology companies assessed in the study by KnowTheChain, an online resource for business, had made progress since the last report was published in 2016. But the study found there was still room for improvement. “The sector needs to advance their efforts further down the supply chain in order to truly protect vulnerable workers,” said Kilian Moote, project director of KnowTheChain, in a statement. Intel, HP and Apple scored the highest on the list, which looked at factors including purchasing practices, monitoring and auditing processes. China-based BOE Technology Group and Taiwan's Largan Precision came bottom. Workers who make the components used by technology companies are often migrants vulnerable to exploitative working conditions, the report said.  About 25 million people globally were estimated to be trapped in forced labor in 2016, according to the International Labor Organization and rights group Walk Free Foundation. Laborers in technology companies’ supply chains are sometimes charged high recruitment fees to get jobs, trapped in debt servitude, or deprived of their passports or other documents, the report said. It highlighted a failure to give workers a voice through grievance mechanisms and tackle exploitative recruiting practices as the main areas of concern across the sector. In recent years modern slavery has increasingly come under the global spotlight, putting ever greater regulatory and consumer pressure on firms to ensure their supply chains are free of forced labor, child labor and other forms of slavery. From cosmetics and clothes to shrimp and smartphones, supply chains are often complex with multiple layers across various countries — whether in sourcing the raw materials or creating the final product — making it hard to identify exploitation. Overall, large technology companies fared better than smaller ones, suggesting a strong link between size and capacity to take action, the report said. Amazon, which ranked 20th, was a notable exception, it said. “Top-ranking brands ... are listening to workers in their supply chains and weeding out unscrupulous recruitment processes,” Phil Bloomer, head of the Business & Human Rights Resource Center, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. A spokesman for Amazon said the report drew from old and incomplete information and failed to take into account recently launched anti-slavery commitments and initiatives. HP said it regularly assessed its supply chain to identify and address any concerns and risks of exploitation. “We strive to ensure that workers in our supply chain have fair treatment, safe working conditions, and freely chosen employment,” said Annukka Dickens, HP's director for human rights and supply chain responsibility. Intel, Apple, BOE Technology and Largan Precision did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Trump's family separation policy has Republicans starting to panic about 2018

CNN POLITICS - 2 hours 10 min ago
Just five months before the midterm elections, Republicans are scrambling to distance themselves from the Trump administration's widely panned "zero tolerance" immigration policy that has resulted in the separation of children from their families at the southern border.

Sen. Ted Cruz introduces 'emergency' bill to keep immigrant families together, slams Dems' proposal

FOXNEWS POLITICS - 2 hours 12 min ago
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, on Monday announced a plan to introduce comprehensive "emergency legislation" designed to end unnecessary separations of illegal immigrant children from their parents.

Acting DEA head Robert Patterson says he plans to retire

CNBC - 2 hours 12 min ago
He said that planning for the future had become "increasingly challenging in an acting capacity."

BBC: Trump says US will not be a migrant camp

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 14 min ago
"Not on my watch," says the US president, as his administration defends its immigration crackdown.

Trump says US will not be a migrant camp

BBC - 2 hours 14 min ago
"Not on my watch," says the US president, as his administration defends its immigration crackdown.

California pushes movie industry diversity with tax credit

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 2 hours 16 min ago

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California lawmakers are trying to encourage better sexual harassment reporting and diverse hiring in the movie industry through the state's film tax credit program.

The Assembly on Monday approved an update to the tax credit program, which awards up to $330 million per year in credits to ...

US Senate blocks F-35 sales to Turkey

FINANCIAL TIMES - 2 hours 16 min ago
The measure could delay sale of 100 planes worth close to $10bn
Categories: FINANCIAL NEWS

BBC: US child migrants recorded crying

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 22 min ago
In audio reportedly from inside a US border facility children can be heard crying as an agent jokes.

US child migrants recorded crying

BBC - 2 hours 22 min ago
In audio reportedly from inside a US border facility children can be heard crying as an agent jokes.

Tesla's Musk alleges 'extensive' employee sabotage

TECHNEWS - 2 hours 22 min ago
SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk accused an employee of "extensive and damaging sabotage" to the company's operations in an email sent on Monday to company employees.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

BBC: The girls who defied IS to keep learning

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 22 min ago
The Islamic State group banned girls from attending school, but these friends found a way to study.

The girls who defied IS to keep learning

BBC - 2 hours 22 min ago
The Islamic State group banned girls from attending school, but these friends found a way to study.

Feeling the heat?

BBC TECH - 2 hours 26 min ago
As demand for air conditioning goes through the roof, what are the implications for our planet?
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

Kansas voter ID law requiring proof of citizenship struck down by judge

WASHINGTON TIMES POLITICS - 2 hours 30 min ago

WICHITA, Kan. — A federal judge has ruled Kansas cannot require proof of U.S. citizenship to register to vote, a setback for Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach in a case with national implications for voting rights.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson sided with voters Monday that Kansas cannot require ...

Qatar pushes back against Trump fundraiser's hacking allegations

CNN POLITICS - 2 hours 33 min ago
Qatar is pushing back against requests for documents that a Trump ally says would show the Gulf nation hacked his private emails and shared them with the press.

Experts: US Auto Tariffs Would Raise Prices, Cost Jobs

VOICE OF AMERICA - 2 hours 33 min ago
Every workday, about 7,400 trucks mostly loaded with automotive parts rumble across the Ambassador Bridge connecting Detroit and Canada, at times snarling traffic along the busy corridor. But if President Donald Trump delivers on threats to slap 25 percent tariffs on imported vehicles and components, there will be far fewer big rigs heading to factories that are now humming close to capacity on both sides of the border. The tariff threat could be a negotiating ploy to restart stalled talks on the North American Free Trade Agreement. But it also could be real, since the administration already has imposed duties on $50 billion worth of Chinese imports, as well as steel and aluminum from China, the European Union, Canada and Mexico. Tariffs against China include some autos and parts but if those spread to Canada and Mexico, the impact will be far larger because auto manufacturing has been integrated between the three countries for nearly a quarter century. The Commerce Department said in a statement last week that it "has just launched its investigation into whether imports of auto and auto parts threaten to impair the national security. That investigation, which has only just begun, will inform recommendations to the president for action or inaction." If the wider auto tariffs are imposed, industry experts say they will disrupt a decades-old symbiotic parts supply chain, raise vehicle prices, cut new-vehicle sales, cost jobs in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, and even slow related sectors of the economy. "It seems like it is going to be so devastating that I can't imagine that they're actually going to do it," said Kristen Dziczek, vice president of labor and economics at the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think tank. Trump, who was sniping on Twitter at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after a contentious economic summit of the Group of Seven earlier this month, told the Commerce Department to look at national security reasons to justify tariffs with hopes of bringing factory jobs to the U.S. He tweeted that the administration would "look at tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!" But experts predict the tariffs likely would do the opposite, slowing the economy as other countries retaliate. Here's what they say is likely to happen: Auto prices rise, sales fall The tariffs would be charged on parts and assembled autos. Canada, Mexico and others would likely retaliate with duties, and automakers won't be able to absorb all of the increases. So, they will have to raise prices. Imported parts, which all cars and trucks have, will cost more, further raising costs. "We're all going to pay a lot more for vehicles," said Tim Galbraith, sales manager of Cavalier tool and manufacturing in Windsor, Ontario, near Detroit, maker of steel molds used to produce plastic auto parts. About 44 percent of the 17.2 million new vehicles sold last year in the U.S. were imported from other countries, and half of those came from Canada and Mexico. All have parts from outside the U.S., sometimes as much as 40 percent. Based on the 24-year-old NAFTA, automakers and suppliers constantly ship fully assembled vehicles as well as engines, transmissions and thousands of small widgets across both U.S. borders. Parts also come from China and other countries. It's difficult to determine how large any price increases would be. But some back-of-the-envelope calculations show that a Chevrolet Equinox small SUV made in Canada would cost about $5,250 more in the U.S. if General Motors doesn't eat part of it. That's based on an average price of $30,000 in the U.S. for the hot-selling Equinox, made primarily in Ingersoll, Ontario. Tariffs are charged on the manufacturing cost, which is about 70 percent of the sales price. Toyota's RAV4, a main Equinox competitor and the top-selling vehicle in the U.S. that's not a pickup truck, also is made in Canada and would face the same duties. "An import tariff would hurt consumers the most since it would increase the costs of vehicles and parts," Toyota said in a statement. Honda's CR-V, another small SUV, is made in Ohio and would be exempt from the tariff on assembled vehicles, so it would have a price advantage. But about one-quarter of its parts come from other countries. That would force Honda to raise its price too, said Dziczek. With higher prices, many people will either keep current vehicles or buy used ones. Jeff Schuster, senior vice president LMC Automotive, expects U.S. new-vehicle sales would fall 1 million to 2 million per year if tariffs are imposed. Since U.S. auto factories making popular models are running near capacity, automakers couldn't do much in the short run to build more vehicles in the U.S. and avoid the tariff, Schuster said. Jobs lost As sales fall, auto and parts makers would need to cut costs by laying off workers. Mexico and Canada would be hit first, but since they import parts from the U.S., component makers domestically also would have to cut. For instance, the RAV4's engines are made in Alabama and transmissions in West Virginia. If sales drop, those factories wouldn't need as many workers. On the assembly line at the Ontario Equinox factory, the 2,400 workers are worried about the escalating dispute, said Joe Graves, the union president. "I don't really see how one individual can change everything that was put in place over decades," Graves said of Trump. "It does cause a lot of uncertainty and instability with our members." As sales slump, dealers who sell imported cars would lay off workers, too. The pro-free trade Peterson Institute predicted that if other countries impose tariffs, U.S. auto production would fall 4 percent, costing 624,000 U.S. jobs in about one-to-three years. Other sectors of the economy would also be hit because autos touch nearly all manufacturing, said Dan Ujczo, a trade lawyer in Columbus, Ohio. Tariffs would "be a shock wave through the economy. And that will be a red line for Congress to step in and do something," he predicted. Retaliatory tariffs from other countries would likely hit U.S. agriculture and other businesses, curtailing exports and also costing jobs, Dziczek said. Companies with price advantages due to the tariffs may increase U.S. production, and that could bring more jobs. But Schuster and others expect they would raise production with the existing workforce. Although Trump would like to see auto and parts production relocated to the U.S., experts say such moves are not likely. It would take several years and billions of dollars to plan and build new plants, which companies would be reluctant to do without knowing the tariffs are permanent. It's possible the next president could undo the tariffs, and the industry likely would wait for that, Dziczek said.

Experts: US Auto Tariffs Would Raise Prices, Cost Jobs

VOICE OF AMERICA POLITICS - 2 hours 33 min ago
Every workday, about 7,400 trucks mostly loaded with automotive parts rumble across the Ambassador Bridge connecting Detroit and Canada, at times snarling traffic along the busy corridor. But if President Donald Trump delivers on threats to slap 25 percent tariffs on imported vehicles and components, there will be far fewer big rigs heading to factories that are now humming close to capacity on both sides of the border. The tariff threat could be a negotiating ploy to restart stalled talks on the North American Free Trade Agreement. But it also could be real, since the administration already has imposed duties on $50 billion worth of Chinese imports, as well as steel and aluminum from China, the European Union, Canada and Mexico. Tariffs against China include some autos and parts but if those spread to Canada and Mexico, the impact will be far larger because auto manufacturing has been integrated between the three countries for nearly a quarter century. The Commerce Department said in a statement last week that it "has just launched its investigation into whether imports of auto and auto parts threaten to impair the national security. That investigation, which has only just begun, will inform recommendations to the president for action or inaction." If the wider auto tariffs are imposed, industry experts say they will disrupt a decades-old symbiotic parts supply chain, raise vehicle prices, cut new-vehicle sales, cost jobs in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, and even slow related sectors of the economy. "It seems like it is going to be so devastating that I can't imagine that they're actually going to do it," said Kristen Dziczek, vice president of labor and economics at the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think tank. Trump, who was sniping on Twitter at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after a contentious economic summit of the Group of Seven earlier this month, told the Commerce Department to look at national security reasons to justify tariffs with hopes of bringing factory jobs to the U.S. He tweeted that the administration would "look at tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!" But experts predict the tariffs likely would do the opposite, slowing the economy as other countries retaliate. Here's what they say is likely to happen: Auto prices rise, sales fall The tariffs would be charged on parts and assembled autos. Canada, Mexico and others would likely retaliate with duties, and automakers won't be able to absorb all of the increases. So, they will have to raise prices. Imported parts, which all cars and trucks have, will cost more, further raising costs. "We're all going to pay a lot more for vehicles," said Tim Galbraith, sales manager of Cavalier tool and manufacturing in Windsor, Ontario, near Detroit, maker of steel molds used to produce plastic auto parts. About 44 percent of the 17.2 million new vehicles sold last year in the U.S. were imported from other countries, and half of those came from Canada and Mexico. All have parts from outside the U.S., sometimes as much as 40 percent. Based on the 24-year-old NAFTA, automakers and suppliers constantly ship fully assembled vehicles as well as engines, transmissions and thousands of small widgets across both U.S. borders. Parts also come from China and other countries. It's difficult to determine how large any price increases would be. But some back-of-the-envelope calculations show that a Chevrolet Equinox small SUV made in Canada would cost about $5,250 more in the U.S. if General Motors doesn't eat part of it. That's based on an average price of $30,000 in the U.S. for the hot-selling Equinox, made primarily in Ingersoll, Ontario. Tariffs are charged on the manufacturing cost, which is about 70 percent of the sales price. Toyota's RAV4, a main Equinox competitor and the top-selling vehicle in the U.S. that's not a pickup truck, also is made in Canada and would face the same duties. "An import tariff would hurt consumers the most since it would increase the costs of vehicles and parts," Toyota said in a statement. Honda's CR-V, another small SUV, is made in Ohio and would be exempt from the tariff on assembled vehicles, so it would have a price advantage. But about one-quarter of its parts come from other countries. That would force Honda to raise its price too, said Dziczek. With higher prices, many people will either keep current vehicles or buy used ones. Jeff Schuster, senior vice president LMC Automotive, expects U.S. new-vehicle sales would fall 1 million to 2 million per year if tariffs are imposed. Since U.S. auto factories making popular models are running near capacity, automakers couldn't do much in the short run to build more vehicles in the U.S. and avoid the tariff, Schuster said. Jobs lost As sales fall, auto and parts makers would need to cut costs by laying off workers. Mexico and Canada would be hit first, but since they import parts from the U.S., component makers domestically also would have to cut. For instance, the RAV4's engines are made in Alabama and transmissions in West Virginia. If sales drop, those factories wouldn't need as many workers. On the assembly line at the Ontario Equinox factory, the 2,400 workers are worried about the escalating dispute, said Joe Graves, the union president. "I don't really see how one individual can change everything that was put in place over decades," Graves said of Trump. "It does cause a lot of uncertainty and instability with our members." As sales slump, dealers who sell imported cars would lay off workers, too. The pro-free trade Peterson Institute predicted that if other countries impose tariffs, U.S. auto production would fall 4 percent, costing 624,000 U.S. jobs in about one-to-three years. Other sectors of the economy would also be hit because autos touch nearly all manufacturing, said Dan Ujczo, a trade lawyer in Columbus, Ohio. Tariffs would "be a shock wave through the economy. And that will be a red line for Congress to step in and do something," he predicted. Retaliatory tariffs from other countries would likely hit U.S. agriculture and other businesses, curtailing exports and also costing jobs, Dziczek said. Companies with price advantages due to the tariffs may increase U.S. production, and that could bring more jobs. But Schuster and others expect they would raise production with the existing workforce. Although Trump would like to see auto and parts production relocated to the U.S., experts say such moves are not likely. It would take several years and billions of dollars to plan and build new plants, which companies would be reluctant to do without knowing the tariffs are permanent. It's possible the next president could undo the tariffs, and the industry likely would wait for that, Dziczek said.

9-0 ruling masks deep division on gerrymandering at Supreme Court

CNN POLITICS - 2 hours 37 min ago
The Supreme Court's rejection of Democrats' challenge to districts they say were rigged on a partisan basis by Wisconsin Republicans came on a 9-0 vote, but dueling opinions revealed internal conflicts and portend difficulty ahead for any future gerrymandering claim.

TASS [Russian State News]: Russia’s statistics service upgrades 2017 industrial production growth estimate to 2.1%

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 41 min ago
Manufacturing increased by 2.5%, according to Rosstat’s revised data

Russia’s statistics service upgrades 2017 industrial production growth estimate to 2.1%

TASS [Russian State News] - 2 hours 41 min ago
Manufacturing increased by 2.5%, according to Rosstat’s revised data

Tesla's stock keeps rising as Elon Musk tweets

CNBC - 2 hours 42 min ago
Elon Musk's tweets might be the best indicator of Tesla's stock.

DHS head Nielsen says immigration crisis 'is not new,' calls on Congress to act

FOXNEWS POLITICS - 2 hours 42 min ago
Under withering questioning from the White House press corps, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen insisted Monday that the growing crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border "is not new" amid a national outcry over the separation of immigrant children from their parents.

Senate Rebukes Trump With Vote to Reinstate ZTE Sales Ban

ZTE lost a skirmish with U.S. lawmakers Monday when the Senate passed legislation that would reinstate a ban on sales of U.S. components to the Chinese telecommunications company.

BBC: XXXTentacion: Controversial rapper shot dead in Florida

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 47 min ago
The US rapper XXXTentacion, who topped the charts as he faced domestic violence charges, has been killed aged 20.

XXXTentacion: Controversial rapper shot dead in Florida

BBC - 2 hours 47 min ago
The US rapper XXXTentacion, who topped the charts as he faced domestic violence charges, has been killed aged 20.

Why banks’ biggest risk factor may be employees who don’t speak up

AMERICAN BANKER - 2 hours 49 min ago
Senior leaders may say that they want to hear bad news, but that doesn’t mean lower-level employees are eager to share it with them.

Senate passes defense bill, battle looms with Trump over China's ZTE

REUTERS POLITICS - 2 hours 49 min ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate passed a $716 billion defense policy bill on Monday, backing President Donald Trump's call for a bigger, stronger military but setting up a potential battle with the White House over Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE Corp.

Senate passes defense bill, battle looms with Trump over China's ZTE

TECHNEWS - 2 hours 49 min ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate passed a $716 billion defense policy bill on Monday, backing President Donald Trump's call for a bigger, stronger military but setting up a potential battle with the White House over Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE Corp.
Categories: TECHNOLOGY NEWS

Cramer's warning on recent tech IPOs: Be careful with their sky-high valuations

CNBC - 2 hours 52 min ago
Jim Cramer cautions investors about a group of newly public software stocks that could be prime for a pullback.

(USA) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE: DoD Halts Planning for Ulchi Freedom Guardian Exercise, Spokesperson Says

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 2 hours 53 min ago
Consistent with President Donald J. Trump's commitment to North Korea and in concert with South Korea, the United States military has suspended all planning for Ulchi Freedom Guardian, this August's defensive war game.

DoD Halts Planning for Ulchi Freedom Guardian Exercise, Spokesperson Says

(USA) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE - 2 hours 53 min ago
Consistent with President Donald J. Trump's commitment to North Korea and in concert with South Korea, the United States military has suspended all planning for Ulchi Freedom Guardian, this August's defensive war game.

MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski unloads on 'cowardly' Nielsen over briefing 'full of lies'

FOXNEWS POLITICS - 2 hours 55 min ago
Mika Brzezinski, co-host of MSNBC's "Morning Joe," unloaded on Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen in a tweetstorm on Monday as the DHS official spoke out on the outcry over the separation of some children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border.

I’ve surrendered: Irrfan on battling cancer

TIMES OF INDIA - 2 hours 57 min ago
‘Uncertainty is the only certainty’, observes Irrfan, as he gives us a glimpse into his ongoing journey – from the shock of the diagnosis to the calmness of the realisation that ‘the cork doesn’t need to control the current it’s floating in’

Russia's Lavrov, U.S.'s Pompeo discuss Syria, Koreas by phone: Russian ministry

REUTERS POLITICS - 2 hours 59 min ago
MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo spoke by telephone on Monday and discussed Syria and problems of the Korean peninsula, Russia's foreign ministry said.

REUTERS: Amid outrage over children, White House defends immigration policy

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 3 hours 58 sec ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as criticism mounted over detained immigrant parents being separated from their children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages.

Amid outrage over children, White House defends immigration policy

REUTERS POLITICS - 3 hours 58 sec ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as criticism mounted over detained immigrant parents being separated from their children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages.

Amid outrage over children, White House defends immigration policy

REUTERS - 3 hours 58 sec ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as criticism mounted over detained immigrant parents being separated from their children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages.

White House denies separating families is 'policy,' but insists it is needed 'to protect children'

CNBC - 3 hours 1 min ago
The White House continued to claim that separating families at the border was not administration 'policy.'

More than 60% of voters oppose Trump administration's family separation policy, poll says

CNBC - 3 hours 3 min ago
The poll underscores the backlash Trump and closely associated congressional Republicans could face for the policy.

CEO of US marijuana company MedMen says Oregon, Colorado are 'horrible markets' to be in

CNBC - 3 hours 4 min ago
Jim Cramer sits down with MedMen Enterprises co-founder and CEO Adam Bierman to hear about the U.S. marijuana industry.

Trump demands credit for getting along with Kim Jong Un

CNN POLITICS - 3 hours 5 min ago
President Donald Trump continued to defend his budding relationship with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Monday, demanding credit for his role in making "initial steps toward a deal" by establishing a personal rapport with the young dictator during last week's summit in Singapore.

Trump's long history of don't blame me-ism

CNN POLITICS - 3 hours 10 min ago
Don't blame me...

Rapper XXXTentacion shot dead in Florida

SKY NEWS - 3 hours 12 min ago
Rapper XXXTentacion has been shot dead in south Florida.

VOICE OF EUROPE: France's Macron Sets Out Corporate Law Shake-up in Reform Bill

POLITICAL AVENUE NEWSROBOT - 3 hours 13 min ago
France’s finance minister promised to cut red tape on companies, open up more financing for them and create incentives for employee profit-sharing under a new bill presented on Monday. The proposed law is part of President Emmanuel Macron’s pro-business reform drive that has already eased labour laws and cut companies’ and entrepreneurs’ taxes. “The law’s ultimate objective is more growth and the creation of a new French economic growth model,” Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told reporters. Le Maire said that by 2025 the overhaul of French corporate law was expected to boost overall gross domestic product by one percent over the long term. The new law aims to address one long-standing complaint from business owners about a complex system that imposes new charges in multiple stages as companies increase their workforce. The bill would simplify the system, Le Maire said, by halving the number of those stages to three — bringing in new charges and obligations when a company has 11, 50 and then 250 employees. It would also make it easier, cheaper and faster to register a company, giving entrepreneurs a single online platform to replace the current round of seven administrative bodies. Liquidation of insolvent companies will be sped up so business owners can move on and bankruptcy law will give more power to creditors who have a stake in seeing the firm survive, the minister added. The government aims to boost the more than 220 billion euros French people currently hold in long-term retirement savings, which it hopes will make more funds available to be invested in companies' capital. To do that, employees’ voluntary contributions will largely be made tax-deductible for all types of savings products and they will be able to transfer savings from one money manager to another at no cost, potentially boosting competition, according to a statement on the bill. The government aims to make profit-sharing much more common in small companies by scrapping charges employers currently have to make on payouts to employees. Largely because of that measure, the new law is expected to cost the government 1.2 billion euros annually, which Le Maire said would be paid for by planned cuts in subsidies to companies. The law also sets the stage for several large privatizations with the proceeds already earmarked for a new 10 billion euro innovation fund. It will in particular lift legal restraints on selling down stakes in airport operator ADP and energy group Engie while allowing the national lottery FDA to be privatized. While some left-wing and far-right politicians have said the sales amounted to selling the family jewels, Macron’s party has a sufficiently large parliamentary majority to pass the bill with little trouble early next year.

France's Macron Sets Out Corporate Law Shake-up in Reform Bill

VOICE OF EUROPE - 3 hours 13 min ago
France’s finance minister promised to cut red tape on companies, open up more financing for them and create incentives for employee profit-sharing under a new bill presented on Monday. The proposed law is part of President Emmanuel Macron’s pro-business reform drive that has already eased labour laws and cut companies’ and entrepreneurs’ taxes. “The law’s ultimate objective is more growth and the creation of a new French economic growth model,” Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told reporters. Le Maire said that by 2025 the overhaul of French corporate law was expected to boost overall gross domestic product by one percent over the long term. The new law aims to address one long-standing complaint from business owners about a complex system that imposes new charges in multiple stages as companies increase their workforce. The bill would simplify the system, Le Maire said, by halving the number of those stages to three — bringing in new charges and obligations when a company has 11, 50 and then 250 employees. It would also make it easier, cheaper and faster to register a company, giving entrepreneurs a single online platform to replace the current round of seven administrative bodies. Liquidation of insolvent companies will be sped up so business owners can move on and bankruptcy law will give more power to creditors who have a stake in seeing the firm survive, the minister added. The government aims to boost the more than 220 billion euros French people currently hold in long-term retirement savings, which it hopes will make more funds available to be invested in companies' capital. To do that, employees’ voluntary contributions will largely be made tax-deductible for all types of savings products and they will be able to transfer savings from one money manager to another at no cost, potentially boosting competition, according to a statement on the bill. The government aims to make profit-sharing much more common in small companies by scrapping charges employers currently have to make on payouts to employees. Largely because of that measure, the new law is expected to cost the government 1.2 billion euros annually, which Le Maire said would be paid for by planned cuts in subsidies to companies. The law also sets the stage for several large privatizations with the proceeds already earmarked for a new 10 billion euro innovation fund. It will in particular lift legal restraints on selling down stakes in airport operator ADP and energy group Engie while allowing the national lottery FDA to be privatized. While some left-wing and far-right politicians have said the sales amounted to selling the family jewels, Macron’s party has a sufficiently large parliamentary majority to pass the bill with little trouble early next year.

Pages

MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT

Subscribe to THE POLITICAL AVENUE ™ aggregator

MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT