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Top 10 Crypto Books on this page. NSA logotype.





POLITICAL AVENUE CRYPTOLOGY AND CRYPTOGRAPHY WORLD LIBRARY MENU







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Ensuring the privacy and confidentiality of data stored on and transmitted between information systems is another important aspect of computer security, and this is built on the foundation of cryptography, the branch of mathematics concerned with procedures for encrypting and decrypting information. Cryptanalysis is the study of how to crack encryption algorithms or their implementations. The basic terminology is that cryptography refers to the science and art of designing ciphers; cryptanalysis to the science and art of breaking them; while cryptology, often shortened to just crypto, is the study of both.


If we check the 'old-scool', there are two kinds of cryptosystems: symmetric and asymmetric. In symmetric systems the same key (the secret key) is used to encrypt and decrypt a message. Data manipulation in symmetric systems is faster than asymmetric systems as they generally use shorter key lengths. Asymmetric systems use a public key to encrypt a message and a private key to decrypt it. Use of asymmetric systems enhances the security of communication. Every security professional should be familiar with the basics of this field, including knowledge of Public key cryptography with its elements of certificates, signatures, certificate authorities (CAs), and public key infrastructure (PKI). More computer security books will be added with a link from this directory. Can we please ask of you, that you DO NOT download what you don't read! [Bandwidth problems] We will keep what we have here forever, so it's no hurry to download everything! Just bookmark instead. Here you can find the TOP TEN BOOKS ON CRYPTOGRAPHY AND CRYPTOLOGY! And (some) computer security books and manuals.

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Political Avenue chryptography library files here.







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Ciphers really came into their own during WWI and WWII. Entire military and government departments were dedicated to the tasks of coming up with new methods of making secret messages. In addition to making secret messages, these offices also had to figure out how to decrypt the enemy’s secret messages. It was from that base of intelligence that modern cryptography has come to be. The government soon discovered that, war or no war, they still had to create secret messages. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition (meaning= conduct or speech inciting people to rebel against the authority of a state or monarch ) has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export.
Unfortunately, encryption methods have become increasingly sophisticated out of necessity, as the theft and unauthorised decryption of sensitive information has grown right along with electronic commerce itself. Illegal decryption is often the basis for cyber crimes such as identity theft. By the first decade of the 21st century, this type of fraud was already affecting millions of people in the United States alone, resulting in the losses of billions of dollars by businesses and consumers.

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